Chris Ofili: Night and Day

“I’ve found that the night and twilight here enhances the imagination. In the city our relationship to the night is very particular because it’s always illuminated, but here it’s unlit, so you’re relying on the light of the moon and sensitivity of the eyes.”
– Chris Ofili (2010)*

Installation view of the exhibition, Chris Ofili: Night and Day. Photo by Maris Hutchinson/EPW All artworks © Chris Ofili. Courtesy David Zwirner, New York/London . Source: http://artobserved.com
Installation view of the exhibition, Chris Ofili: Night and Day. Photo by Maris Hutchinson/EPW All artworks © Chris Ofili. Courtesy David Zwirner, New York/London . Source: http://artobserved.com

Chris Ofili: Night and Day was the title of the artist’s first solo retrospective in the USA, curated by Massimiliano Gioni (New Museum, New York, 29 October – 1 February 2015).  The exhibition featured more than 30 of Ofili’s paintings, collages and a selection of sculptures displayed over three floors of gallery space at 235 Bowery. Continue reading Chris Ofili: Night and Day

“American Policing: Lessons on Resistance” – Discussions at the Schomburg in New York

American Policing: Lessons on Resistance’ is the title of a panel discussion that took place at the Schomburg in New York on 18th February 2015 as a follow-up conversation to their recent town-hall-style debate on ‘American Policing: The War on Black Bodies’. The session featured wide-ranging commentary on issues related to police brutality, racial discrimination, ‘stop and frisk’/’stop and search’ policies, and community-led responses to the killing of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Aiyana Stanley-Jones and others in recent news.

Contributing speakers (from left to right): Mychal Denzel Smith; Cherrell Brown; Philip Agnew; Dante Barry; and Ashley Yates. Source: Schomburg Center, New York.

The panel discussion was moderated by writer Mychal Denzel Smith (The Nation), with contributions from the following four political activists and social commentators: Ashley Yates (poet and co-creator of Millennial Activists United), Dante Barry (Director of Million Hoodies Movement for Justice), Philip Agnew (Co-founder of Dream Defenders) and Cherrell Brown (National Organizer with Equal Justice USA). Closing comments were also provided by Dr Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

Central to the debate were questions about what justice might look like if black lives actually mattered in the USA; strategies for restructuring, de-militarizing and dismantling policing systems so that their historical origins in the States as organisations founded on the surveillance and restriction of the lives, mobilities and freedoms of black and brown people did not continue to perpetuate racialized discrimination; critiquing the complexities of campaigning against the Prison Industrial Complex (PIC) and the increasing monetization of incarcerated black bodies; envisioning safe communities; aligning anti-racist  political activism with wider education and culture agendas – including activism via the arts; routes into community-based activism and leadership for young people; self-esteem/’self-love’/self-care and spirituality issues within movements for social change; and effective ways to disseminate counter-narratives to help challenge the normalisation of privileged white citizenship to the detriment of others’ lived realities.

Continue reading “American Policing: Lessons on Resistance” – Discussions at the Schomburg in New York

Debates about the “The War on Black Bodies,” situated in contrasting cultural spaces in New York and London

“How can we transform the ways in which identity is conceived so that identities do not emerge and function only through the oppression and subordination of other social identities?”
– Elizabeth Grosz (2011). Source: Becoming Undone: Darwinian Reflections on Life, Politics, and Art (Grosz, 2011: 89)

“The War on Black Bodies” (Part 1) – the debate in New York

Schomburg-Debate-War-On-Black-Bodies
Schomburg debate – American Policing: The War on Black Bodies. Left to right: Khalil Muhammad, Claudia De La Cruz, Joel Diaz, Darnell Moore and Jelani Cobb. Source: http://new.livestream.com/schomburgcenter/events/3357875.

On the 9th September 2014 I went online to view the live stream of a panel discussion and Q&A about racialized policing in the USA – titled, “The War on Black Bodies,” held at the Schomburg (Center for Research in Black Culture) in Harlem, New York (see: American Policing: The War on Black Bodies)* The ‘Town-Hall-style’ forum was moderated by the Schomburg’s Education Associate, Joel Diaz, and featured contributions from Khalil Muhammad (Schomburg Center Director), historian and journalist Jelani Cobb, rights activist Claudia De La Cruz (Founder of Da Urban Butterflies) and activist Darnell Moore (organiser of the Black Lives Matter campaign).

Continue reading Debates about the “The War on Black Bodies,” situated in contrasting cultural spaces in New York and London