Sculptural Subjects: Figures and Encounters in Space

Throughout June, July and August I visited a number of exhibitions where sculptural representations of the human body dominated the presentations. Although each showcase was distinctive, the unifying aspect was the way the artists and/or the curators had installed the works to provoke powerful encounters between the sculptures and the moving bodies of the visitors interacting within the architectural settings of the galleries. Below is a review of a selection of the works, with additional details about the venues where they were most recently displayed.

Desrie Thomson-George’s ‘Jilo: The Survivor’ (2018) – Borough Road Gallery, London

Jilo: The Survivor was the title of a solo retrospective by the Guyanese-born British contemporary visual artist Desrie Thomson-George, displayed at London Southbank University’s Borough Road Gallery (July 2018). Several of the drawings and sculptures presented in this exhibition featured representations of the artist’s alter ego, Jilo. Collectively, these works conveyed aspects of the life struggles experienced by black women over many generations throughout the African diaspora(s) worldwide, particularly in relation to challenging racism, sexism, inequalities and injustices in order to achieve a liberated sense of self.

IMG_20180712_184749
Contemporary visual artist Desrie Thomson-George photographed next to a sculpture displayed as part of her exhibition ‘Jilo: The Survivor,’ London Southbank University, Borough Road Gallery, 12 July 2018. Photo: Carol Dixon

Desrie’s figural sculptures are often created using Jesmonite embedded with recycled materials (such as metal, glass, latex and textiles). and many of them present the realisation and maturation of the liberated female self in a series of stages, so that the process of achieving a positive sense of identity and wholeness is visualised as a life-long journey. In her artist’s statement written to promote the exhibition, Desrie explains:

“My work is driven by political, social and cultural issues of being a Black woman living in the West… Through the creation of figurative sculptures and installations I tell the story of Jilo, a Black woman, her struggles and her journey. Her invisibility, while being visible, and the irony of this. I experiment with recycled metal, glass, paper and textiles… selected deliberately to symbolise different states of being. For example: metal for strength; latex – invisibility and vulnerability; glass – fragility; and paper – media or propaganda.”

Continue reading “Sculptural Subjects: Figures and Encounters in Space”

Advertisements