Exhibition Mondialité at the Villa Empain, Brussels (until August 2017)

Late Cuban artist Wifredo Lam is among the artists included in the exhibition entitled “Mondialité,” featuring visual artworks and spaces, documentary film, songs, dramaturgical structures, and archival material. The exhibition “aims to bring visitors into contact with Édouard Glissant’s thought,” and is realized with the collaboration and support of Sylvie Sema Glissant and the Institut du Tout-Monde […] The exhibition, curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist and Asad Raza, opened on April 19 and is on view until August 27 at Villa Empain of the Boghossian Foundation. Villa Empain-Centre for art and dialogue between the cultures of the East and the West, is located at 67 Avenue Franklin Roosevelt in Brussels […]

via Art Exhibition: “Mondialité” — Repeating Islands

A gallery of images from this exhibition is also viewable online via the Villa Empain website at http://www.villaempain.com/en/exhibitions/imaginary-frontiers-2/mondialite/

Walthamstow, Women and William Morris: Claire Twomey’s “Living Installation” in East London

I was fortunate to visit the William Morris Gallery in Walthamstow (east London) this weekend to view a beautiful art installation by British ceramicist Claire Twomey before this temporary exhibition closed to the general public on 18 September 2016.

Detail from the contemporary ceramic art installation "Claire Twomey: Time Present and Time Past" (2016), nspired by the work of William Morris. Photo: Carol Dixon
Detail from the contemporary ceramic art installation “Claire Twomey: Time Present and Time Past” (2016), inspired by the work of William Morris. Photo: Carol Dixon
Photographic portrait of the artist, graphic designer, philanthropist and social justice campaigner William Morris. The original was taken in the 19th century.
Photographic portrait of the artist, graphic designer, philanthropist and social justice campaigner William Morris –  taken in 1857

The one-room installation – Claire Twomey: Time Present and Time Past (William Morris Gallery, 18 June – 18 September 2016) – was initially inspired by William Morris’s working drawing Chrysanthemum (1877) and took the form of a series of 150 ceramic tiles, each measuring 30 x 30 cm, placed on a large table covering the entire ground floor temporary exhibition gallery next to the museum’s café/restaurant

The enlargement and transformation of Morris’s 19th century floral design into a vast 21st century ceramic installation by Claire Twomey was a visual reflection of a poignant statement about temporality and the importance of tangible, inter-generational acts of cultural remembrance that William Morris wrote more than 120 years ago:

Design for Chrysanthemum (1877) by William Morris. This unfinished design is on display in Gallery 2 at the WMG (Walthamstow) and inspired Claire Twomey's 2016 installation. Photo: Carol Dixon
Design for Chrysanthemum (1877) by William Morris. This unfinished design is on display in Gallery 2 at the William Morris Gallery (Walthamstow) and inspired Claire Twomey’s 2016 installation. Photo: Carol Dixon

“The past is not dead, but is living in us, and will be alive in the future which we are now helping to make.”
William Morris (1893) – quotation taken from the preface to “Medieval Love,” by Bartholomew Anglicus

Rather than painting all the individual tiles independently, the ingenuity of Claire Twomey’s artistic intervention was to make the new installation an entirely collaborative process – from the commissioning of digital technicians and expert tile makers from Stoke-on-Trent in the Potteries to assist with the initial digital transfer techniques onto blank white tiles, right through to extending an open invitation to local artists to volunteer as “apprentices” to help paint each individual tile periodically throughout the duration of the exhibition (over c.100 days) using a combination of regular enamel paints with muted colour tones of sage green, ochre, rusts and greys, and also over-layering thin coats of 22-carat gold enamel paint to create a subtly intricate floral mosaic with a spectacular, shimmering surface lustre. Continue reading Walthamstow, Women and William Morris: Claire Twomey’s “Living Installation” in East London

National Gallery of Jamaica Pays Tribute to Cecil Cooper (1946-2016)

The National Gallery of Jamaica pay tribute to the celebrated visual artist Cecil Cooper (b. Hanover, Jamaica, 1946 – 2016), and extend their sincerest condolences to Cecil Cooper’s wife Rose, his children, other members of his family, and his many friends.

National Gallery of Jamaica Blog

Cecil Cooper at his studio in November 2015 (photograph courtesy of Donnette Zacca) Cecil Cooper at his studio in November 2015 (Donnette Ingrid Zacca photograph)

The National Gallery of Jamaica has received the sad news of the passing of the renowned Jamaican painter, singer, and art educator Cecil Harvey Cooper, CD, on the morning of September 15, 2016.

Cecil Cooper was born in the parish of Hanover, Jamaica, in 1946 and was one of the first graduates, in 1966, of the full-time diploma that had been introduced at the Jamaica School of Art under the directorship of Barrington Watson. He also lived in the USA, where he studied and obtained a BFA and, later, an MFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York City. Cecil Cooper in 1981 became the head of the painting department of his alma mater, the Jamaica School of Art, which is now part of the Edna Manley College. He continued in that position until his retirement…

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Verso E-Book Sale: up to 90% off many titles (sale ends 2nd Sept.)

Please see below the link to the Verso e-book sale – which offers 90% off many classic titles. I have just purchased the following e-books – all for less than £2 each. The sale ends tonight (2nd September 2016): “The Exform” by Nicolas Bourriaud; “Dialectic of Enlightenment” by Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer; “The Storyteller” by Walter Benjamin; and “Abnormal: Lectures at the Collége de France, 1974–1975” by Foucault.

Verso have a massive e-book sale with 90% off a huge range of their books until the end of today (Friday 2 September 2016). You could pick up the new translation of Henri Lefebvre’s Metaphilosophy for just £2, and all three volumes of the Critique of Everyday Life for £2.50. Verso asked me to come up with my […]

via Verso e-book sale – 90% off – and my five picks — Progressive Geographies

“Collectif CONTRE-Exhibit B”: The campaign against Brett Bailey’s ‘Human Zoo’ installation gains pace in Paris…

Carol Dixon at the Place du Trocadéro, overlooking the Eiffel Tower - 15 November 2015
Carol Dixon at the Place du Trocadéro, overlooking the Eiffel Tower – 15 November 2015

How timely to be currently on a research trip in Paris just as the campaign against the presentation of Brett Bailey’s ‘Exhibit B’ (Human Zoo) installation is taking shape and gaining momentum in the French capital.

Over the past few days I have been inspired by the passion and commitment of the Parisian campaign organisers “Collectif CONTRE-Exhibit B” – a recently established collective of writers, artists and political activists who are working tirelessly to spread the word about the problematic content of Brett Bailey’s live performance project so that prospective audiences will not attend… and also to alert the wider public in France about the inappropriate, inaccurate,  insensitive and offensive content in this (so called) theatre arts piece (NB: Please see my earlier blog posts for a description about the content of ‘Exhibit B’ here).

A photograph showing one of the controversial tableau vivant (live performance scenes) in South African artist Brett Bailey's installation - 'Exhibit B: Third World Bunfight'. Source:  The Mail Online - http://www.dailymail.co.uk/
A photograph showing one of the controversial tableau vivant (live performance scenes) in South African artist Brett Bailey’s installation – ‘Exhibit B: Third World Bunfight’. Source: The Mail Online – http://www.dailymail.co.uk/
The internationally renowned Guadeloupean-born French novelist Maryse Condé has added her powerful voice to the campaign against 'Exhibit B' in Paris. Image source: http://www.africansuccess.org/
The internationally renowned Guadeloupean-born French novelist Maryse Condé has added her powerful voice to the campaign against ‘Exhibit B’ in Paris. Image source: http://www.africansuccess.org/

Many high-profile academics, cultural commentators, writers and performance artists – including the celebrated French-language novelist (of Guadeloupean heritage) Maryse Condé, the political scientist Professor Françoise Vergès, and the French songwriter and recording artist Bams – have added their names and voices to the ‘anti-Exhibit B’ campaign, and are helping to communicate a strong and unified perspective about how dangerous it is for an ill-informed theatre director like Brett Bailey to pursue a project dealing with the physical violence, psychological traumas and painful legacies of past 19th century colonial racisms by falsely depicting African people as silent and passive participants in this historical narrative.
Continue reading “Collectif CONTRE-Exhibit B”: The campaign against Brett Bailey’s ‘Human Zoo’ installation gains pace in Paris…