ALBUS – an exhibition of photography by Justin Dingwall and Thando Hopa (ArtCo Gallery, Germany)

South African photographer Justin Dingwall and lawyer and model Thando Hopa have recently collaborated on a new project featuring photographic portraits that address albinism as a key theme. Both the model and the photographer have created a series of poignant images that invite audiences to reflect on – and rethink – attitudes towards beauty, skin colour, corporeality and albinism as a condition caused by a lack of melanin in the skin that can affect people from every ethnic background.

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This image – titled,”GRAZIA” (2015) by Justin Dingwall , from the ALBUS series – recently featured as part of the ArtCo Gallery presentation displayed at the 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair in London (Somerset House, October 2016). Photo: Carol Dixon (8/10/16)

In addition to the presentation of these striking visual images, Dingwall and Hopa aim to inspire a public debate about the historical taboos that surround the subject of albinism, as well as  draw attention to the devastating levels of discrimination, threats of physical violence and actual bodily harm many people with albinism have experienced throughout history because of the superstitions that persist in some societies around the world.

Dingwall and Hopa’s series of photographs taken between 2014 and 2015 will be displayed in a new solo exhibition – titled, “ALBUS” (27 November 2016 – 13 January 2017)  at the ArtCo Gallery, Aachen, Germany.
Continue reading ALBUS – an exhibition of photography by Justin Dingwall and Thando Hopa (ArtCo Gallery, Germany)

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Memory and Museums at “AfroEuropeans V” (University of Münster, Germany)

Earlier in September I was pleased to present a conference paper at AfroEuropeans V: Black Cultures and Identities in Europe (University of Münster, 16-19 September 2015) – the fifth biennial network event exploring socio-political issues and spatialities relating to histories of migration, diaspora formation, economic interdependencies and cultural links between Africa and Europe.

My contribution formed part of a diverse programme of speeches, panel presentations, structured debates and artistic performances that enabled participants to engage in wide-ranging, interdisciplinary dialogues about past and present-day life experiences of Africans and Diasporans in Europe, with a particular focus on the role of activism within academia.

Jamie Schearer (founding member of the European Network for People of African Descent) giving the opening keynote address at the AfroEuropeans V conference. 17 September 2015.
Jamie Schearer (founding member of the European Network for People of African Descent) giving the opening keynote address at the AfroEuropeans V conference. 17 September 2015.

The opening keynote address by political scientist Jamie Schearer (a founding member of the European Network for People of African Descent (ENPAD)) set an optimistic tone for the conference by outlining the many positive and tangible ways ENPAD was initiating effective advocacy and awareness-raising campaigns, publishing educational resources and providing safe spaces for discussing the many complex and challenging issues of race and racism(s) faced by Africans in Europe. Some of the most successful projects recently undertaken in Amsterdam, London, Warsaw and Berlin were foregrounded – including the Black Heritage Amsterdam Tours, the “# Ferguson is Everywhere” campaign, and wider political lobbying related to issues of police violence, racial profiling, and inequalities within systems of justice. Fittingly, we were reminded of key figures in German history and political activism who have made significant contributions to discourses on challenging  racism, xenophobia, stereotyping, anti-blackness, sexism and homophobia – not least the Afro-German poet and educationalist May Ayim (1960-1996), and the African-American writer and rights activist Audre Lorde (1934-1992). Continue reading Memory and Museums at “AfroEuropeans V” (University of Münster, Germany)

El Hadji Sy’s ‘alchemy of assemblages’ at the Weltkulturen Museum in Frankfurt

Bal des nations (2010), by El Hadji Sy. Acrylic and tar on butcher's paper, 130 x 90 cm.
Bal des nations (2010), by El Hadji Sy. Acrylic and tar on butcher’s paper, 130 x 90 cm.

Earlier this month I went to Germany to undertake gallery-based research at the Weltkulturen Museum (Museum of World Cultures) in Frankfurt and spent time reviewing the temporary exhibition, El Hadji Sy: Painting, Performance, Politics (5 March-10 October, 2015).

This detailed retrospective about the life and work of internationally renowned Senegalese artist-curator and activist El Hadji Sy (b. 1954, Dakar) features a series of thematic assemblages comprising carefully selected historical objects from the Weltkulturen Museum’s extensive ethnographic collections juxtaposed with a range of contemporary paintings and installations created by El Hadji Sy and a number of fellow Senegalese artists dating from the early 1970s through to the present day.

Wall painting: Portrait du President (2012), acrylic and tar on butcher's paper, 190 x 200 cm. Floor painting: Le Puits (2014), acrylic and tar on jute sacking, 245 x 280 cm. El Hadji Sy's artworks are displayed with four stools from Papua New Guinea that are part of the Weltkulturen Museum collection.
Wall painting: Portrait du President (2012), acrylic and tar on butcher’s paper, 190 x 200 cm. Floor painting: Le Puits (2014), acrylic and tar on jute sacking, 245 x 280 cm. El Hadji Sy’s artworks are displayed with four stools from Papua New Guinea that are part of the Weltkulturen Museum collection.

El Hadji Sy’s association with the Weltkulturen Museum can be traced back to 1985 when he was first commissioned by the then director of the Museum für Völkerkunde (Museum of Ethnology), Franz Josef Thiel, to curate a collection of contemporary paintings by Senegalese scholars affiliated to fine arts schools such as the École de Dakar, as well as works by self-taught artists. This curatorial activity was later accompanied by a published anthology of contemporary arts practice in Senegal co-edited with German education scholar and art patron Friedrich Axt (Axt and Sy 1989). Their professional partnership, which began when both lived in Dakar, led to a long friendship, transnational correspondences over many decades and numerous collaborations on international arts initiatives that lasted until Axt’s death in 2010.

Presented in 13 rooms over two floors of display space the exhibition is illustrative of  the way El Hadji Sy’s curatorial “alchemy of assemblages” communicate on several discursive levels: as a series of spatial and temporal conversations between the artist and staff at the Weltkulturen Museum; between objects and texts from the past and the present positioned in museum space; between Senegal and Germany at the level of transnational arts policy and exhibiting practices; and between Africa and Europe with regard to globalised, cross-cultural and geopolitical discourses. Continue reading El Hadji Sy’s ‘alchemy of assemblages’ at the Weltkulturen Museum in Frankfurt

Contemporary Art Conversations: “In the Heart of the Lights,” by curator Simon Njami

Wir-Sind-Alle-Berliner-1884-2014-LogoCurator, writer and art critic Simon Njami will be giving a keynote lecture on 17th February 2015 to launch a series of events at the ICI Berlin Institute for Cultural Inquiry to accompany his current exhibition WIR SIND ALLE BERLINER: 1884-2014 – A Commemoration of the Berlin Congo Conference (on display at SAVVY Contemporary  in Berlin until 28th February 2015).

Image: © Solveig Maria Ebbinghaus. Source: http://blog.artconnectberlin.com/2013/08/20/spotlight-on-savvy-contemporary/
Image: © Solveig Maria Ebbinghaus. Source: http://blog.artconnectberlin.com/2013/08/20/spotlight-on-savvy-contemporary/

The content of the exhibition and the focus of its associated programme of talks, workshops, concerts and film screenings features reflections on 130 years since the (so called) “Scramble for Africa” Berlin Conference took place in 1884. The contributing artists and academics seek to facilitate a conversation that provokes audiences to consider the many complex  ideological, economic, political, geographical and socio-cultural repercussions of this historical event through their various aesthetic responses.

Continue reading Contemporary Art Conversations: “In the Heart of the Lights,” by curator Simon Njami

THE BERLIN CONFERENCE: How art deals with the carving of a continent (Exhibition Review: December 2014)

The following article by art critic Elsa Guily (published online by Contemporary And (C&) magazine) reviews the exhibition ‘Wir sind alle Berliner: 1884-2014’ curated by Simon Njami (and displayed at SAVVY Contemporary, Berlin, 15 November 2014 – 11 January 2015).

Within this exhibition, the 12 featured artists –  Kader Attia, Theo Eshetu, Satch Hoyt, Cyrill Lachauer, Henrike Naumann, Katarina Zdjelar, Bili Bidjocka, Thabiso Sekgala, Sammy Baloji, Filipa César, Mansour Ciss, and Nadia Kaabi-Linke –  each present contemporary reflections on the historical, social-economic, geo-political and cultural impacts of the colonial ‘scramble for Africa’ Berlin Conference of 1884.

Laboratoire de Déberlinisation, installation by Mansour Ciss © Photo Chiara Cartuccia, 2014 (Source: http://www.contemporaryand.com/)
Laboratoire de Déberlinisation, installation by Mansour Ciss © Photo Chiara Cartuccia, 2014 (Source: http://www.contemporaryand.com/)

One of the images featured in the review piece (shown above) is a photograph of the installation ‘Laboratoire de Déberlinisation’ created by the Berlin-based Senegalese artist Mansour Ciss.This conceptual artwork was first developed by Ciss in 2001 and has been described by the artist as a project for encouraging trans-national ‘North-South’ and ‘Eurafrican’ dialogues about the politics of globalisation in the post-colonial era, and also as a symbolic representation of the intersectional space where “the idealism of art meets the realities of geopolitics and economics.”

Link to the full text of the exhibition review: http://www.contemporaryand.com/blog/magazines/how-artists-reflect-on-the-berlin-conference/

Continue reading THE BERLIN CONFERENCE: How art deals with the carving of a continent (Exhibition Review: December 2014)