Eugene Palmer: New Paintings

It was a pleasure to visit the James Hockey and Foyer Galleries at the University for the Creative Arts, Farnham, to view a solo exhibition of new paintings by the Jamaican-British contemporary figurative artist Eugene Palmer.

Entrance to the exhibition “Didn’t it Rain,” displayed at the James Hockey and Foyer Galleries, UCA, Farnham (27 January – 24 March 2018).

Curated by Richard Hylton, the exhibition “Eugene Palmer: Didn’t it Rain: New Paintings” (27 January – 24 March 2018) was divided into the following three series, and also featured a short documentary film showing the artist at work in his studio discussing the development of his portfolio:

(1) “In Between Black and White” was displayed at the main entrance to the gallery and comprised ten close-up portraits of a young black woman. Each one showed different variations in skin tone, either painted in shades of grey, or in full colour. This process of producing nearly identical, repeated portraits, displayed as multiples, is one of the artist’s signature techniques. Collectively, the images encouraged viewers to contemplate issues of race, constructions of identity, the politics of beauty considered in relation to ethnicity and skin tone, and importantly also the complexities of ‘colourism’ – particularly as regards the problematic history of European artists creating stereotyped representations of black women within Western portraiture over many centuries.

“In Between Black and White” (2018) by Eugene Palmer. Photo: Carol Dixon

(2) “Baby Shower,” shown in the foyer area of the University’s library, comprised 12 sketches painted in oil on paper, each representing attendees at a real-life gathering of family and friends to celebrate the forthcoming arrival of a new baby girl.

Sketches from the series “Baby Shower” (2017/18) by Eugene Palmer, displayed in the library at the University for the Creative Arts, Farnham. Photo: Carol Dixon

(3) “Didn’t it Rain” was displayed in the main gallery and showcased ten, larger than life-sized portraits of black women dressed in smart, monochrome skirt suits with matching hats. These works  were arranged in pairs, with each figure painted against a neutral background of either light blue, green, yellow, pink, grey or white.

Black II (yellow), Black III (pink) and Black IV (blue) from the series “Didn’t it Rain” by Eugene Palmer. Photo: Carol Dixon.

Continue reading Eugene Palmer: New Paintings


Engaging Abstraction and Portraiture at the National Gallery of Jamaica

Entrance to the National Gallery of Jamaica, 12 Ocean Boulevard, Kingston. Photo: Carol Dixon

During a recent trip to Jamaica I was pleased to visit the National Gallery, located on Ocean Boulevard in downtown Kingston close to the city’s scenic Waterfront. Although the National Gallery was first established by a special committee of the Jamaican government in the early 1970s, with an embryonic collection of 230 works placed on public display at Devon House in 1974, the artworks were eventually relocated to the current site within Kingston Mall (in a building that was formerly a commercial bank) during the 1990s, occupying more than 2700 square metres of exhibition space.

Interior view of the National Gallery of Jamaica. Photo: Carol Dixon.

Displayed over two floors, the Gallery’s upper level features paintings and sculptures from the permanent collections – including artworks from the Edna Manley Memorial Collection, and holdings of paintings, sculptures, archaeological artefacts and ephemera covering the history of the island dating back to the time of the Taino before 1000 AD/CE.



My particular highlights from the permanent collections included: figural sculptures from the 1930s by Ronald Moody and Edna Manley; a single-figure portrait in oils of a woman at prayer, titled “The Lawd is My Shepherd” (1969) by Osmond Watson; a very poignant and spiritually charged mourning scene “Nine Night” (1949) by David Pottinger; and a beautifully rendered, gentle and amusing oil painting of a “Mother and Child” (1958) by Barrington Watson.

The Lawd is My Shepherd (1969), by Osmond Watson. Oil on canvas. 104 x 87.3cm. Photo: Carol Dixon
Mother and Child (1958), by Barrington Watson. Oil on canvas. Photo: Carol Dixon

At the time of my visit on 17 January 2018 the two temporary exhibitions displayed throughout the ground floor galleries were: “Explorations V: Portraits in Dialogue” – featuring 40 artworks that traced the history of portraiture in Jamaica from the 18th century through to the present day, specifically curated to examine and pose challenging questions about intersected issues of race, class, and gender reflected in the works in focus; and “Engaging Abstraction” – comprising 41 modern and contemporary paintings, sculptures, collages, digital installations and mixed media assemblages, primarily dating from the 1960s through to the 2010s. Continue reading Engaging Abstraction and Portraiture at the National Gallery of Jamaica

Picturing Diversity – The Power of Portraiture

I am seldom more satisfied with a gallery visit than on the occasions when you walk into an exhibition space intending to view one thing, and then stumble on something quite unexpected that turns out to be far more interesting than the artwork or display you originally planned to see. The 3rd August 2017 turned out to be one of those days, when my attention and intentions were solely focused on a long-awaited and much-anticipated trip to the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square to see the stunning tapestry-based artwork “The Caged Bird’s Song” (2017).

Tapestry-based artwork “The Caged Bird’s Song” (2014-2017) by Chris Ofili CBE, hand-woven to the artist’s specifications by textile artists from Dovecot Tapestry Studio. The three-panelled artwork was on display at the National Gallery, London, as part of the exhibition “Chris Ofili: Weaving Magic” curated by Minna Moore Ede (displayed until 28/08/2017). Photo: Carol Dixon.

The tapestry was based on an original watercolour painted by Chris Ofili CBE, and hand-woven in partnership with a team of textile artists from Dovecot Studios. The resulting panels were then displayed as part of the celebrated exhibition, “Chris Ofili: Weaving Magic” (Sunley Room, National Gallery, London, 26 April – 28 August 2017).

Three-panelled watercolour “The Caged Bird’s Song” (2014) by Turner Prize-winning British artist Chris Ofili CBE. Photo: Carol Dixon.

The three-panelled tapestry was, of course, as awe-inspiring as the attached pictures suggest. However, the large number of visitors milling in and out of the Sunley Room precluded any opportunity to spend a long period of time quietly contemplating the  scale, splendour and intricacy of this vibrantly colourful piece at my own leisure.


Consequently, I changed tack and headed away to make an impromptu visit to the National Portrait Gallery (NPG) to spend time browsing new works in the contemporary galleries and the exhibition for the 2017 BP Portrait Award.

2017 BP Portrait Award Exhibition at the NPG, London

Among the many beautifully rendered portraits featured in this year’s selection of 53 entries displayed to represent the best of the c. 2,580 entries submitted by artists from 87 countries, the five works that (for different reasons) captured and held my attention were (in no particular order): (1) Corinne, by Anastasia Pollard; (2) Society, by Khushna Sulaman-Butt; (3) Portrait of the artist Jerome Witkin, by David Stanger; (4) Lemn Sissay, by Fiona Graham-Mackay; and (5) Another Fine Day on Elysian Fields Avenue, NOLA, by Eva Csanyi-Hurskin.

“Corinne”, by Anastasia Pollard. Oil on Board. 255 x 205mm. This painting was displayed at the National Portrait Gallery, London, as part of the 2017 BP Portrait Award. Photo: Carol Dixon.

The striking portrait of “Corinne” by Anastasia Pollard is actually quite tiny, measuring just 255 x 205mm. However, the captivating beauty of the sitter and the overall balance of the composition made it one of the most arresting images in the entire exhibition. It was also not surprising that “Corinne” was chosen by the NPG as one of the featured images used for a substantial element of the marketing and publicity for this year’s award – featuring on the cover of the catalogue, as well as on one of five large-scale promotional posters for the exhibition. Continue reading Picturing Diversity – The Power of Portraiture