ALBUS – an exhibition of photography by Justin Dingwall and Thando Hopa (ArtCo Gallery, Germany)

South African photographer Justin Dingwall and lawyer and model Thando Hopa have recently collaborated on a new project featuring photographic portraits that address albinism as a key theme. Both the model and the photographer have created a series of poignant images that invite audiences to reflect on – and rethink – attitudes towards beauty, skin colour, corporeality and albinism as a condition caused by a lack of melanin in the skin that can affect people from every ethnic background.

dscn1609
This image – titled,”GRAZIA” (2015) by Justin Dingwall , from the ALBUS series – recently featured as part of the ArtCo Gallery presentation displayed at the 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair in London (Somerset House, October 2016). Photo: Carol Dixon (8/10/16)

In addition to the presentation of these striking visual images, Dingwall and Hopa aim to inspire a public debate about the historical taboos that surround the subject of albinism, as well as  draw attention to the devastating levels of discrimination, threats of physical violence and actual bodily harm many people with albinism have experienced throughout history because of the superstitions that persist in some societies around the world.

Dingwall and Hopa’s series of photographs taken between 2014 and 2015 will be displayed in a new solo exhibition – titled, “ALBUS” (27 November 2016 – 13 January 2017)  at the ArtCo Gallery, Aachen, Germany.
Continue reading ALBUS – an exhibition of photography by Justin Dingwall and Thando Hopa (ArtCo Gallery, Germany)

Advertisements

Black Portraiture[s] III: Reinventions – Jo’burg Conference, 17-19 November 2016

“BLACK PORTRAITURE[S] III: Reinventions: Strains of Histories and Cultures” is the seventh conference in a series of transnational and diasporic conversations about imaging the black body. It offers a forum that gives artists, activists, educators and scholars from around the world an opportunity to share ideas, from historical topics to current research on the 40th anniversary of Soweto. Presenters will engage a range of topics such as Biennales, the Africa Perspective in the Armory Show, the global art market, politics, tourism, sites of memory, Afrofuturism, fashion, dance, music, film, art, and photography.

image: Kudzanai Chiurai, Genesis XI, 2016
image: Kudzanai Chiurai, Genesis XI, 2016

The conference takes place November 17-19, 2016 at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) in Johannesburg, South Africa, and was planned in collaboration with the U. S. Department of State, U.S. Ambassador to South Africa, Patrick H. Gaspard, Goodman Gallery, Hutchins Center for African & African American Research/Harvard University, New York University’s La Pietra Dialogues, Tisch School of the Arts and the Institute for African American Affairs.

When the conference was first announced, the Dean of Tisch School of the Arts, Allyson Green,  said:

“The world will be greater because of the conversations and explorations that will be held when more than 140 papers and performances are presented on topics such as the global art market, activism, politics, tourism, sexuality, sites of memory, Afrofuturism, fashion, dance, music, film, and photography.”

Allyson Green, Dean – Tisch School of the Arts,
New York University

To view the full conference schedule and see a list of participating speakers, please visit the website http://www.blackportraitures.info/schedule/.

Film footage of keynote presentations from previous conferences in this series can also be viewed online at http://www.blackportraitures.info/live-stream/.

Continue reading Black Portraiture[s] III: Reinventions – Jo’burg Conference, 17-19 November 2016

Creating African Fashion Histories – Conference at The Old Courtroom, Brighton, UK (November 2016)

Fashion Cities Africa (2016), edited by Hannah Pool – featuring information about Nairobi, Casablanca, Lagos and Johannesburg.
Fashion Cities Africa (2016), edited by Hannah Pool – featuring information about Nairobi, Casablanca, Lagos and Johannesburg.

On Wednesday 2 November 2016 Brighton Museum and Art Gallery will be hosting a one-day conference – “Creating African Fashion Histories” – in partnership with the Royal Pavilion and Museums, Sussex Africa Centre, the University of Sussex and the University of Brighton.

Coinciding with the first major UK exhibition dedicated to contemporary African fashion – “Fashion Cities Africa” curated by Helen Mears, Martin Pel and Harriet Hughes (on display at Brighton Museum and Art Gallery until 8 January 2017) – this conference will explore the possibilities and limitations of dress and fashion history within the wider context of current and past narratives about African fashion.

Brighton and Hove, Art Gallery, Museum, fashion Cities Africa, exhibition, Brighton, 2016
Brighton and Hove, Art Gallery, Museum, Fashion Cities Africa, exhibition, Brighton, 2016

Presentations and panel discussions will focus on the construction of African fashion histories; the transmission and translation of African fashion identities; new directions in collecting and curating African fashion and the evolution of new platforms for the dissemination of African fashion.

© Judith Ricketts_2523.jpg
Exhibition view of “Fashion Cities Africa” at Brighton Museum and Art Gallery. Image © Judith Ricketts

Confirmed speakers include: Victoria Rovine (author, African Fashion, Global Style), Carol Tulloch (author, The Birth of Cool: Style Narratives of the African Diaspora), Christopher Richards (curator, Kabas and Couture: Contemporary Ghanaian Fashion), Erica de Greef, Angela Jansen (author, Moroccan Fashion, Design, Culture and Tradition), Heather Akou (author, The Politics of Dress in Somali Culture), Jody Benjamin, Hannah Pool (author, Fashion Cities Africa, curator, Africa Utopia) Helen Jennings (author, New African Fashion) and others. Continue reading Creating African Fashion Histories – Conference at The Old Courtroom, Brighton, UK (November 2016)

Twenty Pound Spectacle: Brett Bailey (Exhibit B)

The following article written by art historian Yvette Greslé presents a very detailed, beautifully written and carefully considered critique of Brett Bailey’s ‘Exhibit B’ project – which also (in turn) cites curator and academic Okwui Enwezor’s well-informed words of wisdom: “Despite the sincerity of the artists who have brazenly maintained a relationship in their work with the black body, there is a certain over-determination that accompanies their gestures. They seem to neglect the fact that the black form is as much a grotesque bearer of traumatised experiences as it is the abject vessel of race as a point of differentiation. More than alerting us to how the stereotype fixes its objects of desire in that freeze-frame of realism, as prior knowledge, the work of these artists exacerbates the stereotype by replaying it, perhaps unconsciously, as if it had always been factual.”…

Twenty Pound Spectacle: Brett Bailey (Exhibit B).

From Mancoba and Sekoto to Mslaba and Sibande: Johannesburg’s Post-Apartheid Emergence as an Art World City

“The embarrassment that my presence caused – to the point of making me, in their eyes, some sort of ‘Invisible Man’ or merely the consort of a European woman artist – was understandable, as before me, there had never been, to my knowledge, any black man taking part in the visual arts ‘avant-garde’ of the Western World.”

– Ernest Mancoba (1904-2002), reflecting on life in Denmark during the CoBrA years, c.1948-50 (Obrist, 2010: 380)

In a similar way to the voices of anti-racist novelists, playwrights, performance poets and musicians from South Africa – not least the singer-songwriter Miriam Makeba, the novelist Mongane Wally Serote and the poet Keorapetse “Bra Willie” Kgositsile, etc. – a number of contemporary visual artists have been highly influential in using art as a platform for commenting on the changing socio-economic and political landscape of post-apartheid South Africa.

Photograph of South African artist Ernest Mancoba.
Photograph of South African artist Ernest Mancoba.

Several early modernists whose work openly challenged the apartheid regime included the abstractionist and sculptor Ernest Mancoba (1904-2002) – who was born in Johannesburg, but emigrated to study fine art in Paris, and later became one of the founder members of the influential CoBrA (Copenhagen, Brussels, Amsterdam) art movement; the abstract expressionist painter Gerard Sekoto (1913-1993) – who in 1940 became the first black South African to have a painting exhibited in the Johannesburg Art Gallery; and the mixed-media illustrator and graphic designer Zwelidumile Geelboi Mgxaji Mslaba (known internationally as Dumile Feni) (1942-1991), who was often referred to as the ‘Goya of the townships’ because of the poignant monochromatic ballpoint pen drawings he created to comment on urban poverty and the struggles against apartheid (Peffer, 2009: 44).  In more recent decades a number of new artists have also emerged from the Johannesburg art scene – largely as a result of the city’s hosting of two successful biennials in 1995 and 1997 that put South Africa on the art world map.

Continue reading From Mancoba and Sekoto to Mslaba and Sibande: Johannesburg’s Post-Apartheid Emergence as an Art World City